2019. Talon Review

2019. Talon Review

“Jarring Bits,” a collaboration with artist Sheila Goloborotko, came to life thanks to Talon editors Kenna Galloway and Kat Roland. This meditation is a way of mourning the deaths of my dear friend Marthe Reed and my mother DeLoris Anderson Moseman. Here, I have given you Part II, Treasured Archive. ARK HIVE is the title of Marthe Reed’s poetry collection being published this month by The Operating System.

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2000. Canohead Portages

Gathering video-footage for a one-woman show, I portaged a canoe in waterless places.

2001. Canoehead Blackbox

Here are some stills from rehearsal of my one-woman show, "How I Became Canoehead." As a cyborg who read poems in a video-filled blackbox theater at iEAR Studios, I earned an M.F.A in Integrated Electronic Arts in 2001.

2018. Counter-Desecration

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I am honored to be included in Counter-Desecration: A Glossary for Writing Within The Anthropocene. The late Marthe Reed and Linda Russo collected 126 terms and definitions articulated by a diverse international group of poets. The anthology promises new vocabulary for “a world on the brink.”

My entry, “animacy,” is part of an ongoing conversation with Meredith Stricker, author of Our Animal. Our walks and talks inhabit California’s Central Coast — site of the 2016 Soberanes Fire and the 2017 bombogenesis pundits called Lucifer. Our shared reading practice seeks solace, kinship, alienation, abeyance, breath, space and light, so says Meredith in "Why Not The Forest.”

animacy: I hunt in Eduardo Kohn’s How Forests Think:An Anthropology Beyond the Human for the word “animacy” while two mutts sleep at my feet. They bark. We go outside. I see the morning glory has finally bloomed; a white butterfly I do not “identify” visits it too. “Situated, intimate engagement.” That’s how I sum up these pages from the chapter entitled “The Living Thought” which begins with barking dogs followed by a silence. In Quechua: hau’ hau’ hau’ then chun.The dogs are dead. Prey to a puma. Kohn unfolds a complex argument: “If thoughts exist beyond the human, then we humans are not the only selves in this world. We, in short, are not the only kinds of we. Animism, the attribution of enchantment to these other-than-human loci, is more than belief, an embodied practice, or a foil for our critiques of Western mechanistic representations of nature.” I read and take notes so as not to count days: Day 32 of the Soberanes Fire; 7 days, says the vet, until my oldest dog will die — food itself a toxin for her now. As an always already we, we remain a toxin for this planet? I read on, taking notes because Kohn’s animacy (or at least his articulation of it) offers possibility.

2013. The Volta

EVENING WILL COME: A MONTHLY JOURNAL OF POETICS

(ISSUE 33, SEPTEMBER 2013—WOMEN OF VISUAL POETRY ISSUE)

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I was fortunate to have a poem, “Jet Black” in a special issue of The Volta: Evening Will Come.

Here are parts of editor Jessica Smith’s introduction:

“What is ‘visual poetry’? Just as the question of ‘what is poetry?’ may be answered differently by every reader and practitioner, so “visual poetry” is hard to define closely. The unifying elements of the visual poems presented here seem twofold: first, the following poets responded to the call for ‘visual poetry’ with the following works (a self-defined community); second, the poems privilege the visual or material over the verbal or sonic…. 

In 2008, Geof Huth edited a feature for Poetry titled “Visual Poetry Today” that included eleven men and only two women, K. S. Ernst and Sheila Murphy. Four years later, a new anthology, The Last Vispo Anthology: Visual Poetry 1998 – 2008 (ed. Nico Vassilakis and Crag Hill), includes many more female poets and a stunning variety of visual poetry from all over the world, but the ratio of male to female poets is still almost 4:1. Meanwhile, in 2008 I edited a feature on women in visual poetry for Phoebe magazine and edited, from 2006 – 2009, a monthly magazine called Foursquare that exclusively published visual poetry by women. For those seeking to define an historical territory for visual poetry, women seem to play an insignificant role in the genre. From my point of view, there are female visual poets everywhere….

The following selection started with a call to a hundred female visual poets and a very tight deadline. mIEKAL aND, Amanda Earl, Luc Fierens, Drew Kunz, rob mclennan and Sheila Murphy were instrumental in helping me gather names and email addresses in the “research” part of the process. I asked contributors to refer their friends, and they were generously forthcoming. Some of the women who responded overlap with the women in The Last Vispo Anthology, but most do not. This selection, like The Last Vispo’s, represents just a fraction of the amount of visual poetry being produced by women. It’s not the first such gathering. But let’s hope it’s not the last.”

 

2014. Dusie, The Ecopoethos Issue

Dusie.og, The Ecopoethos Issue edited by Marthe Reed

http://dusie.org/issueseventeen.html

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ECOPOETHSIE:

ANDERSON MOSEMAN BRYANT BURNS CARRIER CELLUCCI DUNGYDURAND GIEHL GOROBOROTKO GOUGH HAYES HOANG HOFER HUME IIJIMA KAMINSKI KAPIL LEE MENDELSOHN NISSIM  SANTOS PEREZ  NAKA PIERCE POE PLUEKER PREVO STRATCLIFFE REED SAKERSAKLIKAR  SAND SCAPPETONNE RIED RIVERAGARZA RUBY SCHAPIRA SCHMID SIKELIANOS SIKKEMA SIMPSON TABIOS URIBE WALLSCHLAEGER WORKMAN ZOLF

“The generative impulse for this issue of Dusie was in part informed by Timothy Morton’s Ecology Without Nature, his challenge to the notion of ‘nature’ as it has historically been constituted, a notion fundamentally invested in isolating human from nature, nature from human. Constructed through the lenses of political/sociological/economic/environmental (and other) tensions, ‘nature,’ ‘place,’ and ‘environment’ are othered and objectified. At the interstices of ecological zones, species, cities, nations, bodies, those permeable borders separating ‘us’ from ‘them,’ human from other-than-human, insider from outsider, the vulnerable from the powerful, how might we reconfigure our understanding, encounter the unbounded condition having neither center nor margin? 

I sought work from writers and artists that speaks into this eco-socio-political moment as an act of witness and of reach, especially works which, having adopting hybridity’s otherness, do not look back. I was amply rewarded. Lori Anderson Moseman writes in her essay-length engagement with grief and the print-works of Sheila Goloborotko, ‘There is nothing new in this save the ever-growing context of complexity’—’Art’s work is to ask for mercy.’ Complexity and mercy… .’ from Marthe Reed’s introduction.


2016. Forest Under Story

Here’s what editors Nathaniel Brodie, Charles Goodrich and Fredrick J. Swanson have to say about their anthology Forest Under Story: Creative Inquiry in an Old Growth Forest:

“Two kinds of long-term research are taking place at the H. J. Andrews Experimental Forest, a renowned research facility in the Oregon Cascades. Here, scientists investigate the ecosystem’s trees, wildlife, water and nutrients with an eye toward understanding change over varying timescales up to two hundred years or more… . This anthology—which includes work by some of the nation’s most accomplished writers, including Sandra Alcosser, Alison Hawthorne Deming, Jane Hirshfield, Linda Hogan, Freeman House, Robin Wall Kimmerer, Kathleen Dean Moore, Robert Michael Pyle, Pattiann Rogers, and Scott Russell Sanders—grows out of the Long Term Ecological Reflections program and showcases insights of the program’s thoughtful encounters among writers, scientists and place.”

I am honored to have a poem included. “Hope Tour: Three Stops” takes readers to three sites in the forest on a tour with forest scientist Alan Tepley. The poem’s sections visit 1) an old clear-cut, 2) the Blue River Face Timber Sale Unit that was burned as part of the management strategy, and 3) an old growth reference plot that has been left “unmanaged.”

“… perhaps they had wanted fire to kill fewer trees. I am happy / below the charred towers. Landform on this ridge asks for risks. / Snags and seed trees—exposed spires— say  design.   Dare.  / Darkness is the awareness: it may not have been necessary— / their acting here. In this way. … /// Further up the road within what we could have been. / Humbling. The experimental treatments not exactly / an entropy like this…. nearly all she had hoped for / here / then gone.”  Anderson Moseman, pages 154-55

“… perhaps they had wanted fire to kill fewer trees. I am happy / below the charred towers. Landform on this ridge asks for risks. / Snags and seed trees—exposed spires— say design. Dare. / Darkness is the awareness: it may not have been necessary— / their acting here. In this way. … /// Further up the road within what we could have been. / Humbling. The experimental treatments not exactly / an entropy like this…. nearly all she had hoped for / here / then gone.”

Anderson Moseman, pages 154-55

2003. Writing on Air

Fifteen years further into climate change, I am revisiting writings collected in 2003 and published by MIT Press. In their introduction to the Terra Nova anthology,  Writing on Air , editors David Rothenburg and Wandee Pryor offer an collective OM: “This book is eclectic, so say the least. Broken into parts, it looks at air as substance and metaphor, examining weather and objects in the sky. We have sought to give it back its elusiveness. Air escapes use but it also pervades everything we do, from the laughter that trickles out fo our mouths to the light it carries to the page. It unites us, erasing contradictions by being everything at once. It gives and it takes; it allows movement and forbids.”  “From aerial plankton to Navajo wind gods, from joyful singing to painful emphysema, from gentle breezes to violent storms,  Writing on Air  creates a fresh way of thinking about the role of air inner everyday lives. Included in the book are prose pieces by poet Hayden Carruth, paulo de costa, Kristjana Gunnars, filmmaker Werner Herzog, Howard Mansfield, Sarah Menin, and C.L. Rawlings; an excerpt from a play by Carl Djerassi and Roald Hoffmann on the discovery of oxygen; poems by Lori Anderson, Tõnu Õnnepalu, Andrew Schelling, and Virgil Suárez; and art and photography by Manuel Acevedo, Stuart Allen, Marsha Cottrelll, Susan Derges, the Koraw tribe of the Indian hills, Arno Rafael Minkkinen, Tuula Närhinen, and the airborne dancers of Project Bandaloop.”  I am honored to have my “Atomic Nature of MA” included in the conversation.

Fifteen years further into climate change, I am revisiting writings collected in 2003 and published by MIT Press. In their introduction to the Terra Nova anthology, Writing on Air, editors David Rothenburg and Wandee Pryor offer an collective OM: “This book is eclectic, so say the least. Broken into parts, it looks at air as substance and metaphor, examining weather and objects in the sky. We have sought to give it back its elusiveness. Air escapes use but it also pervades everything we do, from the laughter that trickles out fo our mouths to the light it carries to the page. It unites us, erasing contradictions by being everything at once. It gives and it takes; it allows movement and forbids.”

“From aerial plankton to Navajo wind gods, from joyful singing to painful emphysema, from gentle breezes to violent storms, Writing on Air creates a fresh way of thinking about the role of air inner everyday lives. Included in the book are prose pieces by poet Hayden Carruth, paulo de costa, Kristjana Gunnars, filmmaker Werner Herzog, Howard Mansfield, Sarah Menin, and C.L. Rawlings; an excerpt from a play by Carl Djerassi and Roald Hoffmann on the discovery of oxygen; poems by Lori Anderson, Tõnu Õnnepalu, Andrew Schelling, and Virgil Suárez; and art and photography by Manuel Acevedo, Stuart Allen, Marsha Cottrelll, Susan Derges, the Koraw tribe of the Indian hills, Arno Rafael Minkkinen, Tuula Närhinen, and the airborne dancers of Project Bandaloop.”

I am honored to have my “Atomic Nature of MA” included in the conversation.

1991, 1995. 13th MOON, Vol. 9, 13

In addition to bringing The Little Magazineto the University at Albany in 1990, poet/professor/editor Judith Emlyn Johnson helped usher 13th Moon to SUNY Albany in 1991. Dean Francine Frank and Vice President for Research Jeanne Gullahorn helped the Women’s Studies and English department create a new home for the literary journal. 

During my time at U at Albany, favorite issues were the ones devoted to Ethel Schwabacher (Volume IX, Numbers 1 & 2) and Avant-Garde Writing (Volume XIII, Numbers 1 & 2). Kudos to the managing editors of those issues: Wilma Kahn and Catherine Sustana.

I love thinking of Schwabaacher’s “Antigone” (1971) next to Carolee Schneemann “Fresh Blood: A Dream Morphology (1990). Their reinvention of women’s mythologies reverberated through contributors’ work. 

I was lucky to have several poems from my collection Cultivating Excess in Volume IX and the piece “Reading Chora? (A Condensed Duet)” in Volume XIII. The duet was a textjam of Rachel Blau DuPlessis’ (via Kristeva) “Language Acquisition” and Jorie Graham’s “Self Portrait as Demeter & Persephone.”

1995. The Little Magazine, Volume 21.

When I was a doctoral student at the University of Albany, I had the good fortune of being Poetry Editor for   Volume 16   of  The    Little Magazine     and Co-Editor with   Jan Ramjerdi   for   Volume 17 .  But the real exciting time for the magazine was when it went digital under the editorship of   Chris Funkhouser  ,   Belle Gironda   and Ben Henry. I am still hunting for online versions.  No luck. Our early experiments with hypertext are lost?   I particularly mourn the loss of the online   The Little Magazine Volume 21.3 , MAPPING , which included my piece “Door Where Carol Merrill is Still Standing.” Luckily, scholar Karin Sanders wrote about the piece while it was still online. See    Bodies in the Bog and the Archaeological Imagination  .  “If you click on Anderson Moseman’s cyber poem door, you can read about the obedient Carol Merrill; known by a generation of Americans as the quintessentially smiling but mute TV game hostess whose gesture toward the doors (in Moseman’s optic) become a spectacle of sacrifice, not of the bog girl but of the participating ‘victim’ in the greed play of consumerism. If you choose the wrong door and win a goat instead of a car you are, so to speak, sacrificed to the laughter of the audience and viewers. That’s the name of the game. In that game, the bog girl challenges the slick host, Monty Hall, as the poem insinuates a carnality of sacrifice different than one to which she was submitted two thousand years ago.” Luckily the text of the poem survives in my collection  PERSONA .  Thanks to Chris Funkhouser, 150 video and audio files from   Volume 21   of have been salvaged. Funkhouser talks about how co-editor/producers Belle Gironda and Ben Henry made of this CD-ROM in an article on    Jacket2  :  “The CD-ROM publication,   The Little Magazine, Volume 21   (1995), featuring 77 artists, contains 127 audio (.wav) files, many which I recorded; an entire section of the project was devoted to vocal readings, including recordings of John Clarke, Harvey Brown, Robert Grenier, Pierre Joris, Jed Rasula, and Chuck Stein. Unfortunately, the disc does not function on today’s 64 bit Windows systems, which means it is unplayable as originally designed.”  Recordings of my poems in  Volume 21 , “Woman Eating a Grape” and “Woman Eating a Cyst,” can be accessed in the drop down menu  here  at Funkhouser's We Press. Gone are the visuals: Angelina Marino’s painting “Woman Eating a Grape” and the ultrasound of my right breast, but having audio is a gift. Thank you Chris Funkhouser. 

When I was a doctoral student at the University of Albany, I had the good fortune of being Poetry Editor for Volume 16 of The Little Magazine and Co-Editor with Jan Ramjerdi for Volume 17But the real exciting time for the magazine was when it went digital under the editorship of Chris Funkhouser, Belle Gironda and Ben Henry. I am still hunting for online versions.  No luck. Our early experiments with hypertext are lost? 

I particularly mourn the loss of the online The Little Magazine Volume 21.3, MAPPING, which included my piece “Door Where Carol Merrill is Still Standing.” Luckily, scholar Karin Sanders wrote about the piece while it was still online. See Bodies in the Bog and the Archaeological Imagination“If you click on Anderson Moseman’s cyber poem door, you can read about the obedient Carol Merrill; known by a generation of Americans as the quintessentially smiling but mute TV game hostess whose gesture toward the doors (in Moseman’s optic) become a spectacle of sacrifice, not of the bog girl but of the participating ‘victim’ in the greed play of consumerism. If you choose the wrong door and win a goat instead of a car you are, so to speak, sacrificed to the laughter of the audience and viewers. That’s the name of the game. In that game, the bog girl challenges the slick host, Monty Hall, as the poem insinuates a carnality of sacrifice different than one to which she was submitted two thousand years ago.” Luckily the text of the poem survives in my collection PERSONA.

Thanks to Chris Funkhouser, 150 video and audio files from Volume 21 of have been salvaged. Funkhouser talks about how co-editor/producers Belle Gironda and Ben Henry made of this CD-ROM in an article on Jacket2: “The CD-ROM publication, The Little Magazine, Volume 21 (1995), featuring 77 artists, contains 127 audio (.wav) files, many which I recorded; an entire section of the project was devoted to vocal readings, including recordings of John Clarke, Harvey Brown, Robert Grenier, Pierre Joris, Jed Rasula, and Chuck Stein. Unfortunately, the disc does not function on today’s 64 bit Windows systems, which means it is unplayable as originally designed.”

Recordings of my poems in Volume 21, “Woman Eating a Grape” and “Woman Eating a Cyst,” can be accessed in the drop down menu here at Funkhouser's We Press. Gone are the visuals: Angelina Marino’s painting “Woman Eating a Grape” and the ultrasound of my right breast, but having audio is a gift. Thank you Chris Funkhouser.